October, 2017       San Francisco

GTS 2016 Influencers

For many years GTS has brought you the best and the brightest minds in technology and venture capital. This year, we wanted to ask some of our Influencers their thoughts on our “Inspiring What’s Next” topic.

  • Danetha Doe | Money & Mimosas

    • What was your first experience using what you thought was “high technology”? What has replaced this technology today?

      My first experience with “high technology” was a discman. I thought it was so cool that I didn’t have to wait to listen to another song. This technology has since been replaced with the iPod and streaming music.

    • What do you foresee as the hottest industry-changing technology trends in the next 10 years?

      The hottest industry-changing technology trends, in my opinion, will be in the financial space. The movement of money will become instantaneous and financial reporting will be at our fingertips.

    • What companies, universities, technologies and regions of the world do you see leading these trends, and why?

      In terms of FinTech and accounting related technology, I see Singapore, UK, Australia and New Zealand leading these trends. Their financial markets are much more progressive (compared to the States, for example) and allow for a quick adoption of innovative technology.

    • What inspires you in your current industry; and how has technology assisted in the development of your company/organization within this industry?

      I am inspired everyday by how technology has connected me with people across the globe. And allows me to access financial information at a moment’s notice. Coming from an accounting background where I had to wait at least 30 days to see how a company performed the month prior, having access to this data immediately is invaluable.

    • Inspiration vs. Disruption — which one or combination thereof will be predominant for the next generation of successful entrepreneurs.

      I feel that inspiration drives disruption. The next generation of successful entrepreneurs will possess both traits, but if coming from a place of inspiration will guarantee long-term success.

    • Can you give a picture of the world of  industry-changing technology 10 years from now — i.e. describe the next generation of our industries?

      Wow! I’m not sure what one year from now will look like. Ultimately, I feel that we will be moving more towards a global financial market including a widespread adoption of digital currency and a more integrated/global tax system.

    • Is there anything you would like to add or offer participants of #GTS2016 #InspiringWhatsNext?

      Don’t be afraid to be bold. Even if everyone thinks you’re crazy. If you have an idea that will make the world a better place, or improve the life of just one person, go for it and inspire change.

  • Dr. Keith Weiner | Gold Standard Institute USA

    • What was your first experience using what you thought was “high technology”? What has replaced this technology today?

      In high school back in the early 1980's, I was so excited to get access to the line printer terminal that accesses the school district mainframe. Later, they got a few Apple ][+ computers with floppy disk drives. The next year, they got a hard drive that was networked to those computers. It was all so new, and endlessly fascinating. Today, I am sure the cheapest mobile phone has more computing power than that entire lab did. And I know it has more storage; that Corvus hard drive was 10MB.

    • What do you foresee as the hottest industry-changing technology trends in the next 10 years?

      I. Augmented reality is reduced to various apps. In other words, it becomes ubiquitous. Just point your phone at a person, place, sign, building, product, etc. And all the info you want comes up on the screen. People will walk into a crowded bar or trade show, and be much more efficient in who they approach. They will wonder how we ever got along without being able to pull up someone's FB or LinkedIn profile in realtime.

      II. People will have far less need to work in the same physical office. Telecommunications technology, based on 3D spatial audio will provide the kind of experiences that today are only possible on site. A phone call is like a low-res FAX. A Skype call is like setting the FAX machine to "fine resolution". A high-def video call is like a color FAX. None of these conventional technologies provide the experience of being in the Grand Canyon. Just a flat, 2D snapshot of the view from one angle, at best. (Disclosure: my previous company, DiamondWare, developed such technology). 3D audio allows an always-on experience, enabling audio browsing (equivalent to sticking your head in someone's office), peripheral listening, ad hoc conversations, smooth interruptions and recoveries, etc.

      III. The gold standard. Today, there is a worldwide collapse in interest rates. In Europe and Japan, interest in long term bonds is negative. Zero yield is killing pension funds, insurance, retirees, annuities, etc. The antidote to zero or negative yield on paper currency is positive yield on gold. (Disclosure: my current company, Monetary Metals, exists to offer a gold yield on gold). The gold standard is when anyone who wants to, can earn interest on gold.

    • What companies, universities, technologies and regions of the world do you see leading these trends, and why?

      In augmented reality, the existing players who answer the questions of what, where, who, and price seem likely to carve out positions in the augmented reality space. These include Google, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Amazon. However, it often turns out that the dominant player from the last generation is disrupted in the next one. Does anyone remember the presumed permanence of AT&T and IBM? Then later Microsoft. Likely there will be huge companies in this space in 10 years that no one's heard of today. In always-on 3D audio communications, I think it will likely be a startup. I sold DiamondWare to Nortel. Nortel sold the asset to Avaya out of bankruptcy auction. Avaya had little interest in developing the vision.

    • What inspires you in your current industry; and how has technology assisted in the development of your company/organization within this industry?

      I am motivated equally by two factors. I want to make a lot of money and I want to change the world for the better. Bringing back the gold standard is my solution to both needs. We think of interest as a technology, and in today's zero-yield world, a disruptive technology.

    • Inspiration vs. Disruption — which one or combination thereof will be predominant for the next generation of successful entrepreneurs.

      I don't think there is a tradeoff between inspiration and disruption. I think both are necessary in any economy, and doubly so in the present.

    • Can you give a picture of the world of  industry-changing technology 10 years from now — i.e. describe the next generation of our industries?

      First and obviously, it's about cutting costs. Sure Uber is more convenient than a taxi, but more importantly it cuts out an expensive middleman and passes the savings on to the consumer. More broadly, if a startup figures out how to do what currently is done with large investment in capital, and do it without much capital, it can change the world. One current example of this is 3D printing.

    • Is there anything you would like to add or offer participants of #GTS2016 #InspiringWhatsNext?

      I have a different take, being now an economist and social thinker in addition to being an entrepreneur since I originally dropped out of computer science school (and earlier). One has to look at the monetary system to understand the underlying drivers. In many ways, it's like plate tectonics: invisible, slow — and inexorable.

  • Frode Odegard | Lean Systems Institute

    • What was your first experience using what you thought was «high technology»? What has replaced this technology today?

      I basically grew up in my parents’ lab — they had a small embedded systems company. I was assembling circuit boards as a summer job at eight and by thirteen I was writing compilers. So I was very lucky in that for me none of these things were especially wondrous, they were just a natural part of my childhood. That was unusual back then, but it is much more commonplace today. I think the first piece of hardware that really blew me away was my first Sun workstation. It had a huge high-resolution screen, lots of storage and it ran a real operating system.

      Now Smartphones and wearables are everywhere, with tremendous computing power and ubiquitous Internet connectivity at our fingertips. I love my Macs, my iPhone and especially my iPad Pro. The next new thing that really will blow people away is Augmented Reality (AR). It will deeply affect how we interact with machines and with each other. I have no doubt that AR will be a strong contributor to our transformation into a  post-industrial civilization. Machine learning is also developing rapidly and becoming much more accessible to developers. When these two technologies interact, that will truly be magical.

    • What do you foresee as the hottest industry-changing technology trends in the next 10 years?

      In the years ahead I think we will be shifting rapidly from a vertical to a horizontal approach. We need to customize the journey for each student. An important challenge is going to be developing viable new careers for people who will lose their jobs due to machine learning and robotics. We are talking about a lot of people who will need retraining, and many of them will have to go from a high school education to something like a master’s degree. We need to figure out how to build new business models and investment vehicles so we can invest in these individuals over the long term. This is a big challenge — and also a  trillion-dollar economic opportunity. My friend David Nordfors who co-founded Innovation 4 Jobs is doing very exciting work in this area.

      Employee tenures have gone down and the lifetime of organizations is going down too. Employers won’t be around long enough to develop their people for the long run. At the same time, ongoing education is a must for everyone. We will still need structures that can follow and support us for the long haul. I therefore think we may see the return of  medieval-style guilds and Roman collegia, in a  for-profit form.

    • What companies, universities, technologies and regions of the world do you see leading these trends, and why?

      Regions with more economic freedom and more rational and science-friendly cultures will also handle change with less pain. Regions where higher-level education is totally dominated by the government will see less local innovation in the sector and may be more vulnerable to disruption from the outside. People in transition may be viewed by default as a social challenge to be met through government activism rather than as an economic opportunity. This will be a competitive disadvantage for some countries.

      Top-tier universities like MIT, Stanford, Oxford and Cambridge will certainly prevail, but they must work hard to retain their professors, who will easily be able to build their own global e-learning businesses. While established institutions will still be able excel in content production, they may not be as good at supporting individualized development paths and new business models to fuel them. That’s where I see for-profit guilds and collegia taking over. Smaller regional universities may be severely disrupted, caught between newly globalized top-tier learning institutions, fast-moving specialized learning startups and guilds/collegia.

      Augmented Reality will be everywhere we see content delivered by movies and slides today. We will be able to create amazing collaborative learning experiences at a very low cost. AR glass and headset providers such as Meta, Magic Leap, HoloLens (Microsoft) and others, will, together with cloud services such as those from Amazon, Microsoft and Google power a tremendous growth in an industry where the demand will be global. I also anticipate that Apple will address the market with AR glasses and an app store.

    • What inspires you in your current industry; and how has technology assisted in the development of your company/organization within this industry?

      Management Consulting/Disruptive Innovation: I am inspired by leaders in mature companies who dare to face the unknown and begin adopting disruptive technologies before there are easy answers and clear strategies. Many feel uncomfortable and overwhelmed, but they press ahead anyway. These leaders will be the survivors amidst all the upheaval.

    • Inspiration vs. Disruption — which one or combination thereof will be predominant for the next generation of successful entrepreneurs.

      All entrepreneurs are “inspired” by some change they want to see in the world. Near-term monetary gain won’t be enough to sustain most through the trials they have to endure to succeed. However, not all entrepreneurs are disruptive. That’s okay. They can use incremental innovation (a la Lean Startup) to find problems that constitute a market need and build solutions to satisfy that need. The disruptors are the trailblazers — they change the game in industries and may even create whole new industries. I think we are now entering a phase where we will see a tremendous amount of disruption everywhere, utilizing exponential technologies. The trailblazers will be followed by the rest, as the world is remade once again. And that it as it should be.

    • Can you give a picture of the world of  industry-changing technology 10 years from now — i.e. describe the next generation of our industries?

      In Post-Lean methodology we use a model called a Value Stack™ to look at the structure of industries as layers in a cake. The bottom layers are about physical production, ownership of physical assets and manual services. As you move upward, you get to automated services, interfaces to services and assets and markets that allow these to be allocated. Airbnb and Uber occupy the top two layers in the value stack in their respective industries. As you move upward, the capital efficiency gets better because you don’t need to invest much in assets and employees. Most industries now have very inefficient value stacks. Exponential technologies will result in massive automation and a migration of value and investment towards the upper layers of the value stack. The physical will be increasingly commoditized. Every industry will have their version of Uber and Airbnb. A tremendous amount of human work will be automated and we will become accustomed to interacting with increasingly intelligent machine interfaces. We refer to this as &ldaquo;rewriting the value stack&rdaquo; and it will happen everywhere.

    • Is there anything you would like to add or offer participants of #GTS2016 #InspiringWhatsNext?

      We humans are in an exciting transition to a post-industrial civilization. Our technology is advancing at an exponential rate and so is our power over physical matter and our mastery of information. In this time, I encourage everyone to look at the big picture. Yes, you can build solutions to the all kinds of current problems. You can build apps, you can even build today’s version of the pet rock. But why settle for that? Do something hard. Do something that really will change the world and create tremendous value. Also, don’t read more management books, they are all too focused on today and yesterday. Read about tomorrow. Read science fiction. My #1 recommendation is the Golden Oecumene trilogy by John C. Wright.

  • Ingrid Sanders | PopExpert

    • What was your first experience using what you thought was “high technology”? What has replaced this technology today?

      I have a distinct memory from 1998 when I was writing member communications for Prodigy Internet to help our dial up customers learn how to get the most out of the emerging Internet. For our 4th of July message I searched for the best webpage I could find to “celebrate virtually” and the best I could come up with was an extremely simple, slow motion, dot matrix type animation of a couple fireworks on a black background. To think that now we can stream HD video and live video chat across the world is just incredible.

    • What do you foresee as the hottest industry-changing technology trends in the next 10 years?

      There is a big shift under way from older economic structures into a newer paradigm that is more focused on benefits beyond economic value and in recognizing impact and benefit not just for shareholders but for all stakeholders. This started about 15 years ago with growing interest around CSR and triple bottom line reporting and has accelerated recently with the adoption of B Corp as new option for corporate governance accessible even to public companies. I think much of this has emerged as a direct result of the way technology connects us and makes the distances between people, companies, countries seem much smaller and that this will only continue to accelerate in coming years with further adoption of technologies like video chat and virtual reality.

    • What companies, universities, technologies and regions of the world do you see leading these trends, and why?

      We have individual customers in more than 90 countries and work with global companies to help level set skills across hundreds of offices around the world. One of the most exciting trends we see is the incredible thirst for knowledge coming from all corners of the world — so much so that it is often the non US offices that are more engaged and perform more successfully on elearning programs. This passion for learning and technology around the world is what is going to be the biggest driver of innovation in the future.

    • What inspires you in your current industry; and how has technology assisted in the development of your company/organization within this industry?

      We are focused on unlocking access to experts to help everyone learn how to get better at the things that matter most in life and work. There are millions of amazing teachers, coaches and consultants around the world that it just wasn’t possible for people to learn from without technology. We’re changing that through enabling high quality on demand classes and live 1–1 video chats with the best of them.

    • Inspiration vs. Disruption — which one or combination thereof will be predominant for the next generation of successful entrepreneurs.

      I think inspiration is key to this next phase of development. Particularly for millennial, positive change comes from envisioning a new future that addresses some of society’s core challenges and then figuring out to leverage technology to enable it. Collaboration and mutual benefit will be key to this as we are seeing from the emergence of the “sharing economy”.

    • Can you give a picture of the world of  industry-changing technology 10 years from now — i.e. describe the next generation of our industries?

      Thanks in large part to collaboration technologies, many successful companies like Wordpress (Automatic) are moving toward a fully distributed workforce, engaging the best full-time team members they can find, regardless of location. This offers much greater flexibility for individuals, companies and the economy as a whole. Large multi-national corporations which dominated the most recent economic cycles will need to learn how to adapt or risk being displaced by agile, new competitors.

    • Is there anything you would like to add or offer participants of #GTS2016 #InspiringWhatsNext?

      The divide between “work” and “life” is crumbling with people now holding a greater desire to show up at the workplace with their full self and also holding higher expectations for how companies should support their health, happiness and growth. The companies that are able to adapt and incorporate technology to establish collaborative, empowered workforces will be the ones to win.

  • Jeffrey Hayzlett | The Hayzlett Group, C-Suite Network

    • What was your first experience using what you thought was “high technology”? What has replaced this technology today?

      Playing pong from Atari on a TV set.

    • What do you foresee as the hottest industry-changing technology trends in the next 10 years?

      Using personal info to tailor your experience as a customer and what you do individualy.

    • What companies, universities, technologies and regions of the world do you see leading these trends, and why?

      The US will continue to be dominant because it is difficult to replicate the vast resources that became the catalyst.

    • What inspires you in your current industry; and how has technology assisted in the development of your company/organization within this industry?

      The ability to eliminate the 6 degrees of separation. The world is becoming very flat and linear.

    • Inspiration vs. Disruption — which one or combination thereof will be predominant for the next generation of successful entrepreneurs.

      Disruption will always have more value but inspiration gets it noticed.

    • Can you give a picture of the world of  industry-changing technology 10 years from now — i.e. describe the next generation of our industries?

      For example, a platinum member of an airline suddenly stops doing business with that particular airline. They will actually notice it, see them fall off, and interact with them before they actually leave to another airline.

    • Is there anything you would like to add or offer participants of #GTS2016 #InspiringWhatsNext?

      You can have the greatest idea in the world, the greatest service, or the product, BUT IT DOESN'T MEAN ANYTHING if you can market it, sell it, and deploy it over and over.

  • Jeremy Fiance | The Berkeley Fund (#GIC2016 Judge)

    • What was your first experience using what you thought was “high technology”? What has replaced this technology today?

      I grew up as a big gamer and started playing Super Nintendo as soon as I could speak. At the time, I thought the graphics were incredible and my ability to create and manipulate a digital world was empowering. Today, vision and image capture technology has taken this to a completely new level, with applications like Virtual Reality that enable us to experience another world without being there and Drone Technology, which enable us to interact with the physical world from far way.

    • What do you foresee as the hottest industry-changing technology trends in the next 10 years?

      Companies, industries, and individuals are being augmented by machine intelligence.

    • What companies, universities, technologies and regions of the world do you see leading these trends, and why?

      Spending time at UC Berkeley, it has been incredible to see the work being done in artificial intelligence, natural language processing, machine learning, deep learning, among other data driven research areas. UC Berkeley, and other top computer science research universities are laying the fundamentals for startups leveraging data to improve business outcomes.

    • What inspires you in your current industry; and how has technology assisted in the development of your company/organization within this industry?

      I am inspired daily by the incredible technologies and startups in the UC Berkeley community alone. Today, my firm and other investors can leverage data to better source, evaluate, and support startups.

    • Inspiration vs. Disruption — which one or combination thereof will be predominant for the next generation of successful entrepreneurs.

      I see and believe in a multidisciplinary future leading to key inspiration for new companies that leverage insights from different subjects and industries, bring them into new arena, and create disruptive solutions.

    • Can you give a picture of the world of  industry-changing technology 10 years from now — i.e. describe the next generation of our industries?

      The way we live, work, and communicate has been fundamentally changed by software. In ten years, human abilities, including our ability to understand ourselves and the world around us, will be heightened by data-driven software products. More efficient people, will mean the future of work and the structure of organizations will look completely different.

  • Nicola Corzine | Nasdaq Entrepreneurial Center (#GIC2016 Judge)

    • What was your first experience using what you thought was “high technology”? What has replaced this technology today?

      I remember when cell phones in the UK were too large to carry, too expensive for the average company to provide, and near impossible for the average consumer to dream of having. The idea that by 2020, 90 percent of the world’s population over six years old will have a mobile phone is remarkable; it brings a new level to what connected really means and the power of this access.

    • What do you foresee as the hottest industry-changing technology trends in the next 10 years?

      I think we have a long way still before realizing the power of IoT from a utilization perspective. I think we’re likely to see continued innovation occur within the VR space. I’m excited for the continuation of personalized experiences in health and financial services and look forward to seeing how big data evolves over the coming years from a business intelligence engagement.

    • What companies, universities, technologies and regions of the world do you see leading these trends, and why?

      There is a major explosion of global innovation in the above sectors these days. Fro Europe to Latin America, APEC and the America, we’re seeing major advancements across the board in all sectors and stages of startups.

    • What inspires you in your current industry; and how has technology assisted in the development of your company/organization within this industry?

      Working with remarkable talented and diverse entrepreneurs and learning from the greatest mentors is the reason we do what we do! From a non-profit perspective, we’re constantly hungry for tools that enhance our own efficiencies and community engagement; there are so many offerings from established brands and startups alike that enable us to focus more clearly on our core offering and outsource expertise to brands that specialize in the infrastructure and marketing tools we rely on day-in and day-out, yielding us much better results overall.

    • Inspiration vs. Disruption — which one or combination thereof will be predominant for the next generation of successful entrepreneurs.

      I believe it’s a combination; inspiration and disruption are often coupled together. You need the discipline from disruption and the passion from inspiration to make it each day as a founder fueled by continued improvement and success.

  • Pascal Finette | Singularity University

    • What was your first experience using what you thought was “high technology”? What has replaced this technology today?

      Remote controls for television sets (yes, I am really that old). The magic moment when I could change the channel without getting up from the sofa.

      For the last 10+ years I don’t even have a TV anymore. All my media is digital and gets moved around wirelessly…

    • What do you foresee as the hottest industry-changing technology trends in the next 10 years?

      Synthetic biology will change us in a fundamental way. It will change the way we treat diseases, we produce food, we enhance our physical world…

    • What companies, universities, technologies and regions of the world do you see leading these trends, and why?

      Silicon Valley will keep leading a lot of these efforts-particularly from a  thought-leadership perspective. The risk tolerance, the urge to think big and the support infrastructure make this place truly special.

    • What inspires you in your current industry; and how has technology assisted in the development of your company/organization within this industry?

      I am blessed to get to work with all the emerging technologies (and companies which build the future) on a daily basis. We are truly at the epicenter of this tectonic shift.

    • Inspiration vs. Disruption — which one or combination thereof will be predominant for the next generation of successful entrepreneurs.

      You need to be inspired to disrupt. Without the former the latter won’t happen.

    • Can you give a picture of the world of  industry-changing technology 10 years from now — i.e. describe the next generation of our industries?

      I honest to god can’t do this. The world is changing faster, more rapidly and more fundamental than ever before. Thus the future becomes ever blurrier.

    • Yobie Benjamin | World Economic Forum 2015 Tech Pioneer

    • What was your first experience using what you thought was “high technology”? What has replaced this technology today?

      The Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet in 1982 reshaped the landscape of business worldwide making business computing available to all. Interesting to note that the spreadsheets of today have not fundamentally changed from what was Lotus 1-2-3 version 1A. This is perhaps a technology that is ripe for reinvention.

    • What do you foresee as the hottest industry-changing technology trends in the next 10 years?

      There are 2 developments that will fundamentally alter all our lives.

      First, CRISPR — CAS9 (Clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats) The CRISPR interference technique has enormous potential application, including altering the germline of humans, animals and other organisms, and modifying the genes of food crops. By delivering the Cas9 protein and appropriate guide RNAs into a cell, the organism’s genome can be cut at any desired location. biotechnology and we can edit the human genome/germline.

      Second — we will have the ability to deliver any-to-any command and control from anywhere in the planet at any time, regardless of availability of Internet connectivity. This enables M-M ( machine-to-machine ) communication and M-H /DNA (machine to human/DNA) communication. All connectivity scenarios are enabled: 1 — many, many to 1, many to many, 1 — 1. Intelligence and compute power will be at the device and human level while command and control will be universally ubiquitous from every square inch of the planet.

    • What companies, universities, technologies and regions of the world do you see leading these trends, and why?

      No question that Silicon Valley will lead the world and that the US will be the leading country for first time innovation. However, fast follower countries such as China, Russia and India will be fierce competitors.

    • What inspires you in your current industry; and how has technology assisted in the development of your company/organization within this industry?

      I am inspired by the though that one day global ubiquitous connectivity will be an agent of peace and global stability. All technology is borne of prior technologies. My inspiration comes from everyone who has been a pioneer in space from Yuri Gagarin, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin to everyone who has worked in the space and satellite programs globally.

    • Inspiration vs. Disruption — which one or combination thereof will be predominant for the next generation of successful entrepreneurs.

      Disruption and creative destruction will dominate over me-too innovation.

    • Can you give a picture of the world of  industry-changing technology 10 years from now — i.e. describe the next generation of our industries?

      We will have the ability to connect any device to any device or human. We are not even in the beginning of global connectivity. More people in the planet are not connected than those who are. There is something profound when you can connect to biological organisms, machines or people from anywhere in the planet. We cannot even begin to fathom the new applications that will emerge.

    • Is there anything you would like to add or offer participants of #GTS2016 #InspiringWhatsNext?

      Be fearless in the face of cynicism. As people parlay fear of the unknown, we should continue to pioneer discovery and invention of the future. We are fundamentally a good people and the power of good will overcome evil.

Inspiration Wall. What Inspires you in your Industry?

FinTech/crowdfunding:

“I am inspired by the opportunities that open up as the result of the investment industry democratization leading to disruptive online collaboration”.
Catherine Yushina

Accelerators/incubators management:

“I am inspired by entrepreneurs pursuing their endeavors to make difference in the world with so little resources but great stamina and belief”.
Ekaterina Vainberg

Management Consulting/Disruptive Innovation:

“I am inspired by leaders in mature companies who dare to face the unknown and begin adopting disruptive technologies before there are easy answers and clear strategies. Many feel uncomfortable and overwhelmed, but they press ahead anyway. These leaders will be the survivors amidst all the upheaval”.
Frode Odegard

GTS 2015 Influencers

  • Tim Draper

    Founder/Managing Partner, Draper Associates
    Follow me on Facebook and Twitter @TimDraper

    • What was your first experience using what you thought was “high technology”? What has replaced this technology today?

      The Apple Macintosh was like magic. The WYSIWYG interface changed everything. I built my whole business around it.

    • What are the hottest educational trends in the next 10 years?

      MOOCs, Skype tutoring, improved bandwidth to schools, virtual schools, branded online schools, Draper University and schools that challenge the way schools operate.

    • What companies, universities, technologies and regions of the world do you see leading these trends, and why?

      Singapore is always improving their school system. Their government does a nice job of hiring dynamic people who have a strong focus on education. Draper University of Heroes is doing a great job at giving students a whole person experience — not just academic, but emotional and physical training too.

    • Lifelong learning vs. traditional education — which one or combination thereof will be predominant for the next generation of successful entrepreneurs?

      People will be trying to get off the “track” of education dictated by the current school system and “accredited” schools. They just aren’t worth the money anymore. People will try to self educate and take advantage of all that is out there.

    • Can you give a picture of the world of education 10 years from now — i.e. what will the next generation of learners call their “high technology”?

      A combination of “virtual” where the best teachers in the world are in video format and ranked to teach students the concepts they know best plus “social” where students can learn quickly from each other as the virtual schools teach and the students have to learn and spread their knowledge. I envision a “team based” approach, where the grading system is tied to a team of 5 students rather than being so individual.

  • Mr. Muhammed Chaudhry

    President and CEO, Silicon Valley Education Foundation (SVEF)
    Follow me on Facebook and Twitter @SVEFoundation

    • What was your first experience using what you thought was “high technology”? What has replaced this technology today?

      I remember using a clunky Apple II PC that plugged into our home’s land line — with no Internet or cable modems — that prevented you from taking a phone call and working on the computer at the same time. TODAY, with my office-in-the-palm- of-my-hand wireless smartphone (iPhone 6) I can do all my business and personal communication anywhere anytime, no plugs needed.

    • What are the hottest educational trends in the next 10 years?

      The ongoing debate between high tech and high touch will continue. That is, what is the best balance between the use of technology in education and the role of teachers and instructional coaches. There will probably not be one single balance point but rather the best combination of the two for each individual. We will be able to use technology to better deal with individual differences among students, to better track individual performance and achievement, with the goal of greater student outcomes. A colleague of mine was trained as a teacher in the late 1960’s and was told even then that accounting for individual differences in his classroom was crucial and yet with 35 kids in a class for 5 periods a day, individualization was seldom possible. In the next decade teachers will be able to use technology to diagnose, prescribe and authenticate the best educational path for each student in real time and on an ongoing basis. Technology has the potential to make teachers even more important to education than they already are. The Education Cloud will play a more vital role.

    • What companies, universities, technologies and regions of the world do you see leading these trends, and why?

      The companies that will lead the way will most likely be in Silicon Valley — companies that have been around for a while, have a  long-range future and have proven track records for product and idea development, such as Apple, Google, Applied Materials, Cisco, Adobe and Oracle. But many more companies that haven’t even been born yet will certainly be contributors, and very likely they will be from Silicon Valley. Universities, like Stanford, long noted as an incubator for startups with great vision and ideas that change the world, will likely lead the way. Among K-12 school districts, San Jose’s East Side Union High School District has pushed ahead of the curve with its model for collaboration between all schools in its 85, 000-student region, and in promoting a model for other districts in passing a bond measure to pay for bold technology infrastructure improvements to ultimately raise achievement for its disadvantaged students.

      SVEF has already begun to lead trends and foster innovation through our Learning Innovation Hub (iHub), a network that connects education technology developers with teachers to test technology in classrooms with student users. SVEF just completed its third “iHub Pitch Games” — an event similar to TV’s popular show “Shark Tank” — in which six education technology startups were selected to introduce their products to 25 classrooms across 12 Silicon Valley school districts.

    • Lifelong learning vs. traditional education — which one or combination thereof will be predominant for the next generation of successful entrepreneurs?

      The next generation of entrepreneurs will need a combination of traditional education and lifelong learning. With all due respect to Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, most successful entrepreneurs do have solid academic credentials. But an entrepreneur who cannot continually learn new technologies, new concepts, new ideas will be trapped in an endless loop of repeating what has been done before. Lifelong learning built on a solid education foundation is how most successful entrepreneurs will succeed.

    • Can you give a picture of the world of education 10 years from now — i.e. what will the next generation of learners call their “high technology”?

      Since we cannot even predict what Apple or Google will come up with next year, it’s hard to look 10 years down the road. Surely technology wearables will be a part of students’ lives as they will be part of all of our lives. Collaborative tools, such as video chat and shared documents that help students and teachers feel like they’re in the same room will also be a part of the picture. Also, we’ll see students collaborating with peers across the country and across the world via real-time video communication to participate in interactive activities. Students in the future will focus more on thinking skills-especially computational thinking skills rather than on the accumulation of discreet bits of knowledge. Whether all students will need to know how to code may be debatable, but it will be important that students can problem-solve using the logical processes that coders use. Being able to tackle problems, breaking them down into their component elements and then building solutions will be the most valuable skill students will learn in school. What kind of technologies they might use to assist them will not be as important as the thinking skills behind using those technologies.